Ultimate Natural Health Therapy Overview

Functional food Therapeutic Lifestyle Change Intervention Program overview

 

  1. Overview: Functional food Therapeutic Lifestyle Change Intervention Program is step by step complementary and Integrated Medicine procedure, which includes:

 

Step 1. Find out the cause of disease: for example causes for prostatitis, causes for constipation.

 

Step 2.choose the right functional foods recipe per patient’s especial health situation

 

Step 3. Designed to provide patients with the support, knowledge, skills and understanding to enable them to identify and overcome the different challenges faced in the adoption and maintenance of a healthy diet and physically active lifestyle.

 

  1. Functional Foods do have a amazing capability at health improvement.

 

During the first 50 years of the 20th century, scientific focus was on the identification of essential elements, particularly vitamins, and their role in the prevention of various dietary deficiency diseases. This emphasis on nutrient deficiencies or “under-nutrition” shifted dramatically, however, during the 1970s when diseases linked to excess and “over-nutrition” became a major public health concern. Thus began a flurry of public health guidelines including:

The Senate Select (McGovern) Committee’s Dietary Goals for the United States (1977).

The Dietary Guidelines for Americans (1980, 1985, 1990, 1996, 2000- a joint publication of the USDA and the Department of Health and Human Services).

The Surgeon General’s Report on Nutrition and Health (1988), the National Research Council’s Diet and Health (1989) and Healthy People 2000 and 2010 from the U.S. Public Health Service.

All of these reports are aimed at public policy and education emphasizing the importance of consuming a diet that is low in saturated fat, and high in vegetables, fruits, whole grains and legumes to reduce the risk of chronic diseases such as heart disease, cancer, osteoporosis, diabetes and stroke.

 

Scientists also began to identify physiologically active components in foods from both plants and animals (known as phytochemicals and zoochemicals, respectively) that potentially could reduce risk for a variety of chronic diseases. These events, coupled with an aging, health-conscious population, changes in food regulations, numerous technological advances and a marketplace ripe for the introduction of health-promoting products, coalesced in the 1990s to create the trend we now know as “functional foods.” This report includes a discussion of how functional foods are currently defined, the strength of the evidence both required and thus far provided for many of these products, safety considerations in using some of these products, factors driving the functional foods phenomenon, and finally, what the future may hold for this new food category.

 

According to the Department of Health and Human Services, diet plays a role in 5 of 10 of the leading causes of death, including coronary heart disease (CHD), certain types of cancer, stroke, diabetes (non-insulin dependent or type 2) and atherosclerosis. The dietary pattern that has been linked with these major causes of death in the United States and other developed countries is characterized as relatively high in total and saturated fat, cholesterol, sodium and refined sugars and relatively low in unsaturated fat, grains, legumes, fruits and vegetables. An accumulating body of research now suggests that consumption of certain foods or their associated physiologically active components may be linked to disease risk reduction (6). The great majority of these components derive from plants; however, there are several classes of physiologically active functional food ingredients of animal or microbial origin.

 

Refer: European Journal of Clinical Nutrition (2002) 56, Suppl 3, S29-S33. doi:10.1038/sj.ejcn.1601481

 

  1. lifestyle practices have a more massive influence to our health:

 

“A very short list of lifestyle practices has a more massive influence on our medical destinies than anything else in all of medicine,” says Dr David Katz, director of the Yale University Prevention Research Center and president of the American College of Lifestyle Medicine, in a telephone interview. “There’s almost nothing in all of medicine that has the vast, consistent, and diverse evidence base.”

 

He remarked that there is no pill, and there never will be any pill, that can reduce the burden of chronic disease in the way that healthy lifestyle factors can.

So why don’t we use lifestyle factors more?

Refer: http://www.medscape.com/

 

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Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/expert/Maxwell_Chan/1091253

Ultimate Natural Health Therapies

Functional Food Therapeutic Lifestyle Change Intervention/Mediation

Chronic Complex Diseases Ultimate Natural Health Therapy for High Blood Pressure, High Cholesterol, Chronic Constipation, Insomnia/Lack of sleep

Currently Conventional Medicine system of medicine Practiced by most physicians is guided toward Acute Care, the diagnosis and treatment of trauma or short-term urgent care illness, example: heart attack or broken hand. In such situation, Physicians just only need to focus at the immediate problem or symptom with prescribed treatments such as drug or surgery.

 

Nowadays, our society is experiencing a sharp increase in the number of people who suffer from complex, chronic diseases, such as stoke, diabetes, heart disease, cancer, mental illness, and autoimmune disorders like rheumatoid arthritis.

 

A System-Oriented approach medical-healthcare therapy become extremely demanded against above health issues which demand taking into account not only each individual’s unique genetic makeup, but also the aspects of patient’s lifestyle, critical environmental factors such as stress, diet, and exposure to polluted air. Moreover, assessing the underlying cause of complex, chronic disease and applying strategies of nutrition, diet, and exercise to both to treat and prevent patient’s illnesses.

 

Functional Food Therapeutic Lifestyle Change Intervention/Mediation Program is a different approach, with integrated methodology and remedies, which are specially designed to treat and prevent complex, chronic disease.

 

Functional food Therapeutic Lifestyle Change Intervention Program is step by step complementary and Integrated Medicine procedure which includes:

 

Step 1. Find out the cause of disease: for example causes for prostatitis, causes for constipation.

 

Step 2.choose the right functional foods recipe per patient’s especial health situation

 

Step 3. Designed to provide patients with the support, knowledge, skills and understanding to enable them to identify and overcome the different challenges faced in the adoption and maintenance of a healthy diet and physically active lifestyle.

 

For more detail information, Please refer

Depression Caused Insomnia Natural Health Therapy

The relationship between insomnia and depression is far from simple, however. “Until recently, insomnia was typically seen as a symptom of depression,” says Michael L. Perlis, MD, an associate professor of psychiatry and director of the Behavioral Sleep Medicine Program at the University of Pennsylvania. “Treat the underlying depression, the thinking went, and sleep problems would go away. [ Refer: http://www.webmd.com/]

Depression is a mood disorder that causes a persistent feeling of sadness and loss of interest. Also called major depressive disorder or clinical depression, it affects how you feel, think and behave and can lead to a variety of emotional and physical problems. [Depression – Reeve Foundation, https://www.christopherreeve.org/living-with-paralysis/health/depression (accessed September 20, 2016).]You may have trouble doing normal day-to-day activities, and sometimes you may feel as if life is not worth living

Depressions General Symptoms

People with depressive illnesses do not all experience the same symptoms. The severity, frequency and duration of symptoms will vary depending on the individual and his or her particular disease. The symptoms of major depression characteristically represent a significant change from how a person functioned before the disease.

The symptoms of depression include:

Persistent sad, anxious or “empty” feelings

Sense of hopelessness and/or pessimism

Sense of guilt, worthlessness, and/or helplessness

Irritability, restlessness

Loss of interest in activities or hobbies once pleasurable, including sex

Fatigue and decreased energy

Difficulty concentrating, remembering details and making decisions

Insomnia, early–morning wakefulness, or excessive sleeping

Overeating or appetite loss

Thoughts of suicide attempts

Persistent aches or pains, headaches, cramps or digestive problems that do not ease even with treatment

The relationship between sleep and depressive illness is complex – depression may cause sleep problems and sleep problems may cause or contribute to depressive disorders. For some people, symptoms of depression occur before the onset of sleep problems. For others, sleep problems appear first. Sleep problems and depression may also share risk factors and biological features and the two conditions may respond to some of the same treatment strategies. Sleep problems are also associated with more severe depressive illness.

Insomnia is very common among depressed patients. Evidence suggests that people with insomnia have a ten-fold risk of developing depression compared with those who sleep well. Depressed individuals may suffer from a range of insomnia symptoms, including difficulty falling asleep (sleep onset insomnia), difficulty staying asleep (sleep maintenance insomnia), unrefreshing sleep, and daytime sleepiness. However, research suggests that the risk of developing depression is highest among people with both sleep onset and sleep maintenance insomnia. Moreover, by Integrative and Complementary Medicine, It is liver metabolic disorder problem cause Depression; So, Functional Food Therapeutic Lifestyle Change Intervention could be the best option for Depressed Patient’s Insomnia Problem.